Dreamforce 2017, What an experience! Part 2: Dreamforce itself

The dust is still settling from Dreamforce 2017, having only gotten back to the UK Monday afternoon, but I wanted to share my thoughts while they were still fresh in my mind. This is part two of of this blog, the first is here, about my experience speaking at Dreamforce. This blog is about Dreamforce itself.

Dreamforce 2017!

So Dreamforce is over for another year, and it was just as huge and insane as ever. This is my second Dreamforce, with my first being in 2011. It certainly is a lot bigger than when I last remember! As anyone who has been to Dreamforce knows, it is an overwhelming experience and unlike any other tech conference in existence.

For those that don’t know, Dreamforce is Salesforce’s annual user/partner/customer conference and is held each year in San Francisco, CA. This year is was four days from 6th – 9th November and had speakers like Michelle Obama and performances from Alicia Keys and Lenny Kravitz (see, not your usual tech conference!) plus over 2700 sessions from Salesforce employees, partners and customers (one of which was mine!)

Trailhead was very much at the forefront this year, with an entire ‘Trailhead Area’ in moscone west, decked out with fiberglass rocks, trees, grass and even a waterfall. The road between moscone south and north was closed with ‘Dream Valley’ being created, completely covered in astroturf and home to food stands / cafe’s, lots of seating, a music stage and even a rock climbing wall. There was a trailhead quest to complete, a Dreamforce specific badge and plenty of trailhead swag on offer (including the coveted trailhead hoody).

As I experienced the first time at Dreamforce back in 2011, it is one of these conferences you make all of these plans to see 100 sessions and catch up with everyone you know in the community. In reality you and end up seeing 10% of the sessions you planned to, and see more people than you ever expected to. This may sound like a bad thing, but so much of the value you get from Dreamforce is from the people you meet, the sessions you never thought to attend and the demos you see from Salesforce and from other partners/vendors. A key to enjoying Dreamforce is not worrying too much about what you have planned, and just go with the flow of the week.

Dreamforce is where Salesforce makes its big product announcements for the year and holds Developer, Admin, Trailhead and many more keynote sessions. The theme of the main keynote was ‘We are all trailblazers’ highlighting the economic impact salesforce has had, the fourth industrial revolution and the impact it continues to have on the world, how the 1:1:1 model allows salesforce, and other companies to ‘do well, and do good’. Also highlighted was the stories of ‘trailblazers’ such asĀ Stephanie Herrera, most famous for #SalesforceSaturday.

The focus of the product announcements was on customisation, personalisation, deeper AI integration and IoT, with the announcement of myTrailhead, myLightning, myEinsetin, mySalesforce and myIoT. Of these, I particularly liked myTrailhead, Trailhead is a great learning management system, so rolling out to customers, allowing them to create their own internal trails and track metrics etc is a great move. Hopefully this means the end of super boring and clunky internal training systems.

As usual, here were customer demos, this time from T-Mobile, Adidas and 21st Century Fox to highlight these new product announcements. The T-Mobile and 21st Century Fox presentations had the usual level of salesforce polish and smiling people in trailblazer hoodies, however the Adidas one felt a bit odd to me, especially seeing Marc rocking a full adidas tracksuit and trainers! They centered around how salesforce provides a better understanding of customers.

I attended the developer keynote and was excited about some of the announcements, and a bit disappointed in the lack of others. The major focus of the keynote was platform events, a publish/subscribe architecture allowing you to build event driven applications (similar conceptually to things like MQTT), having used similar tech before I was impressed with this and can’t wait to play with it. Improvements to the Lightning Data Service and new standard lightning components were also announced, bringing it closer to making visualforce completely obsolete. There didn’t really seem to be much in the way of enhancements to the Apex language itself (still no case statement…) which was a bit disappointing.

I managed to attend some sessions as well, including Keir’s session on building offline mobile apps with the Salesforce Mobile SDK, Philipe’s on platform events and Chris Eales’ on helping not-for-profit’s succeed. As always the quality of these sessions was very high and it was great to learn new things from others in the community. When the recorded sessions are release, I will do another post about these in more depth.

One of awesome things about Dreamforce is the opportunities to catch up with people in the community that you’ve not seen, and to meet new people that maybe you only know from twitter / online. I thankfully was able to catch up with many people whom I worked with in Australia and had not seen in a few years. I met some great people from the Good Day Sir podcast community, and I met some new people who were fans of SchemaPuker!

As always, the ‘customer success expo’ was full of Salesforce partners and ISVs showing off their products (and giving out some cool swag). Fidget spinners and socks seemed to be all the rage this year. It is always interesting to see what is available for use with Salesforce, and working at a Salesforce partner its good to have a knowledge of what may be out there to provide solutions to customers needs.

Dreamforce is always a huge week, and it never ever feels like you get to do everything you want to do. While some people think that the whole trailblazer/trailhead/character thing is a bit over the top, the underlying message is solid and its good to part of such a supportive community and to be able to attend events like Dreamforce.

As always, a tonne of talks and keynotes are recorded and will be available online, with some already available here, so even if you didn’t make it to Dreamforce this year, you can get some idea of what it was like.